Suresh devised a lovely meal in honor of my visit. Well, he devised several meals in honor of my visit, but this was one of the first. He began the sauce by frying yogurt, and built it up with a leaf of lemon grass and another of allspice. Great fragrances.
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A tadka of *crisp* cumin, chillis and curry leaves finished the dish.
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Here the sauce has been used to poach a filet of fish. And notice the lovely Kerala red rice beneath, too.
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Skillet tandoori chicken. “This is too easy to make,” I complained.
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When I felt under the weather one day, Rathna whipped up this dal-rice porridge to make me feel better. Served with a lovely, lovely pickle. I felt better.
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From khoya, milk fudge…
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…we made these samose, with fat yellow raisins.
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And this photograph doesn’t show it, but this was one of the finest meals I ate in Bangalore, period. Sindhi curry. A succulent sauce thickened with a little chickpea flour.
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Rathna made a snack from these leaves, similar to taro-root leaves I think.
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The paste includes tamarind, ginger, chickpea flour and a little sugar.
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The paste is spread across the leaves and rolled.
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Then steamed.
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Rounds are sliced off the rolls when done steaming, and topped with coconut and mustard seeds. Sorry, no picture.

Here’s a samosa made from a dough like filo. They’re cheap and greasy. Pretty good, tooleafy.jpg.

These are some brilliant pakodas, twice fried, crispy dough around onions and great, yummy jabs of coriander seed. I ate a basket of these cold from the fridge the next day much to Rathna’s horror.
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Another tasty, tasty home cooked meal: crisp fried okra with mango powder, good dal and tomato pulao.
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And lastly, a plate of well-browned cauliflower transformed into a delicious subzi.
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